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9 Reasons Young Adults Are Insane Not To Invest In The Stock Market

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Nearly 80% of millennials are not invested in the stock market. That’s scary! And it means a world of financial regret is on the horizon.

That statistic comes from a 2016 Harris poll which surveyed 500 American young adults (ages 18 to 34) and found the main reasons why they don’t own stock is:

  • 40% don’t feel they have enough money to invest
  • 34% don’t feel educated about it to know how
  • 13% said student debt was the reason they haven’t invested

On one hand, some of these people have a point.

For example, it’s impossible to invest when you have close to $0 in your bank account after bills at the end of the month. And it goes against logic to expect someone to invest when they don’t know how to in the first place.

But I see some excuses at the bottom of this.

For the millennials who say they don’t have enough money, I’d ask them, “What have you done to solve this problem?”

They need to pick up another job, work on the weekend, stop wasting money on clothes and eating out, and save their money so they can invest.

Being uneducated about investing can only be an excuse for so long, too. Start educating yourself with a tool called the internet. It’s free!

And student debt is a big money sucker, but again—make more money, save more, and spend less so you can afford to both pay down student debt and invest in the stock market.

What I’m really advising is for these young adults to stop being soft and start hustling for their future so they can invest.

People miss out big time if they don’t own stocks. Here’s why.

9 Reasons To Invest In The Stock Market

reasons-to-own-stocks

Although many of these benefits can come from investing in the stock market in general, I’m specifically referring to investing in low-cost index funds that mimic the S&P 500, for example.

1) History shows you’re going to make life-changing money.

I don’t throw around the phrase “make life-changing money” lightly. It’s 100% true.

Investing in an S&P 500 Index fund, where you buy a tiny ownership of America’s top 500 public companies (give or take), is a great deal for your future.

If you invest in the stock market in your early twenties, there’s often a jackpot at the end of the tunnel. It’s literally like winning the lottery because you’ll end up with millions if you invest your money wisely.

Look at the graph below to see just the growth from 1980 until now. Better news is the graph remains pretty constant on average if you go back 100 years from now—up and to the right.

s&p-500-index-fund-performance-1980

It’s no wonder Warren Buffett said this,

By periodically investing in an index fund, the know-nothing investor can actually out-perform most investment professionals.

If you don’t have faith in putting your money in the hands of the best public companies in America, who are you going to trust with your money?

Where can you find a better option that history backs up?

Exactly, that’s my point.

P.S. I’m not your financial adviser, but look at the graph one more time and make the only sound conclusion! History often repeats itself.

2) No active work is required to profit big.

Like the video above explains, when you set up automatic contributions (through your employer or own brokerage account) then all you have to do is sit back and let your index fund do the work.

How reassuring is that!? Maybe the greatest quality of investing in the stock market is it’s 100% hands off and doesn’t need your time to produce wealth.

It’s get even better when you do a simple comparison of all the time that’s required to build wealth in other areas.

Real estate: Renting out real estate is a pain in the butt if you’re renters aren’t angels (news flash: most people aren’t angels). You can expect property damage, late payments, missed payments, broken rules, and other nightmares that will really second guess your decision to be a landlord.

And even owning property is a headache because of the crazy expensive closing costs, taxes, property fees, HOA fees, and not to mention the monthly maintenance when the sink or shower breaks. It’s never fun to be nickled and dimed to death, which is a usually a regular occurrence in real estate.

Owning a business: If you’re not willing to be obsessed and let your personal desires die for the good of the company, your company isn’t going to generate significant profits compared to the hundreds of thousands and millions of dollars that investing in the market can.

You can work 80 to 100 hour weeks to build your company and hope it brings you wealth. Or invest in companies like Facebook and Amazon where other people are putting in insane work weeks to churn shareholders like you a profit while you relax on the weekend, and take steps toward financial freedom.

Working as an employee:  The problem with working as an employee is you’re going to have to do some serious corporate ladder climbing to get salary raises and generate some kind of wealth. Even then, odds are you’re not getting a 7% to 10% salary increase every year like the stock market provides on average.

The stock market is the most reliable avenue towards wealth.

3) Incredibly higher rate of return than real estate.

You want to put your money where it can grow and produce more money for you, right? Then go with the stock market. And, don’t buy a home!

According to James Altucher, the commonly shared belief that buying a home is an investment is all too wrong. He points out that from 1890 to 2004, housing returned 0.4% per year. Yikes that’s criminal!

The list of reasons for a house’s poor return include all of the above like upfront closing costs, title insurance, moving costs. And then ongoing expenses like home maintenance when something breaks, property taxes, and the inability to easily move for a better paying job.

If you own stocks instead, you can kiss all of those annoyances goodbye. And not to mention, most importantly, come home with an average return on investment of 7% to 10% if you buy a S&P 500 Index fund.

4) Investing into index funds protects your money against inflation.

Inflation is an ugly beast. It robs you of your hard-earned money, well the true worth and purchasing power of that money, over time. And the worst part is it’s unstoppable, in a sense.

For example, if you keep your money as cash then it’s unstoppable and your dollars will always be worth less as the years pile up.

But there’s a solution. Can you guess the hero of the story?

Investing in the stock market, specifically a S&P 500 Index fund, protects your money from inflation eating away at it.

Reason being is the S&P 500 beats inflation the majority of the time and these types of assets are immune to inflation.

Plus, many companies can pass on the costs to their customers. So if you own shares of these companies, then you’ll get the profits as an investor (even if you take a small hit as a consumer).

This is just another example of why it pays to be an investor and not a consumer.

5) Buying stock is a liquid investment you can sell at any moment.

Run into a tight squeeze where you need immediate money?

Or do you ignore the sound advice to build an emergency savings fund and it bites you in the butt as your car breaks down or you lose your job?

While it’s never a good idea to sell an asset early and get in your own way of bringing in more profits, the fact that stocks are liquid investments can be a life-saver for some.

At any moment of any day, I can sell shares of my individual stocks or index fund and get cash in my checking account as soon as the transfer completes—usually two to three days.

The opposite is true with real estate and other types of investments.

Once that money is taken out of your bank account for a down payment or mortgage payment, then you have no chance of getting that money back on your real estate investment property in the immediate future.

Instead of selling your investment immediately and receiving the money in two to three days with stocks, you may have to wait two to three years to sell your asset if it’s real estate.

Liquid assets like stocks are even more valuable given the quality that you can sell them at any time.

6) Easy to diversity where your money is invested.

Assuming your name isn’t Richie Rich, the odds of you owning 25 different startup companies or 17 penthouse properties across the globe are slim to none.

Though you can own a sliver of 500 different companies or even thousands if you buy index funds listed in the stock market. For example, you can buy a car, technology, food, retail, shoe, farm product, defense, and more companies than you can possibly remember to stay diverse.

Reason I bring that up is diversity is key for the average investor who is scared of losing all of their money or loses sleep when their investments are volatile.

A well-diversified investment portfolio protects against volatility and too much risk, which is hard to come by in other asset types.

7) Get taxed lower for long-term capital gains.

Investing in the stock market doesn’t mean the taxes on your returns completely go away. (Wouldn’t that be a blessing?)

But the taxes you pay on long-term capital gains (stocks you own for longer than 12 months) are significantly decreased compared to getting taxed on regular income.

Add this to the list of reasons it’s in your best interest to invest. If the government incentivizes investing with these tax policies and you still don’t do it, something is wrong with you.

Just don’t buy and sell your stock earlier than a year of holding it or else you’ll be taxed higher since it’d be a short-term capital gains tax (any stock sold before you’ve had it for at least 12 months).

Oh, that’s not it. If your investments lose money, you can also lower your tax bill using those losses. The goal of investing is not to lose money, but if it happens then reducing your tax bill is a decent compromise.

A wealth growing vehicle that also reduces my taxes is a slam dunk investment. This opportunity is yours for the taking as well.

8) It’s the only way to own a percentage of the products and services you regularly buy.

Eat at McDonald’s every day (like my dad does)? You can own a piece of them buy buying MCD.

Are you a big texter and talker on the phone? You can buy shares in Verizon (VZ).

Always enjoy a nice Disney movie to take you back to your childhood? Buy shares in ticker symbol DIS.

The ability to purchases ownership of a company you use all the time is another thing investing in stocks has going for it.

Now would I put all of my money in only products or services I buy? No, but it is a nice mental exercise to purchase ownership of a company that you use all of the time.

Because, in a way, you’re kind of buying from yourself and profiting from yourself. That’s legit!

9) It’s easy to get your feet wet with a small amount of money.

Want to be an angel investor to invest in a hot new startup company? Can’t happen unless you have an annual income of over $200,000 and a net worth of $1 million. Poor people not invited.

Want to invest in Grant Cardone’s real estate fund? Sorry, tough luck. You also need to be an accredited investor.

Want to buy your own multi-family real estate property and rent it out? Good luck collecting that $100,000 down payment to secure the property on top of the mortgage payments every month.

The system blocks out the little investors who can’t make any moves to grow their wealth.

However, it’s easy to start small when buying stocks.

You don’t need to be an accredited investor to invest in companies like Facebook, Amazon, Netflix, and other giant companies like GE.

So if you only have $600 to invest, perfect. Buy $600 worth of shares into a Vanguard index fund and slowly increase your position over time by buying more shares going forward.

Heck there are even new apps out there that will automatically help you invest spare change from purchases like Acorns.

Where buying other assets like real estate and startup investing limit everyone but the rich from participating, anyone can get started investing with as little as a $100 give or take.

And for any parents out there, it’s wise to put your kid’s birthday money into an index fund to get them off on the right start. A little money invested now can likely snowball into millions.

You Reap What You Sow

Two different financial realities await you.

The good news is you’re in control of your financial future. You get to decide the plot line.

If you desire to retire early, have millions in the bank to spend during your golden years, and live a comfortable retirement with your family, all you need to do is start investing.

The bad news is you’re also in control. Meaning you can make the wrong money decisions, not invest in the stock market, and be left with the staggering consequences.

Retirement isn’t fun if you have no money to afford to do anything entertaining. Then post-work life becomes the biggest drag of your life. Some people stop living to such a degree that they wish for death.

So from one young adult to another, make the right choice.

Have a long-term view about life. Buy some shares in a S&P 500 Index fund. And get the financial markets working for your money, not against your money.

Then you’ll give yourself a great opportunity for a happy ending: reaching financial freedom.

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Should I Wait To Buy Bitcoin And Ethereum?

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wait-to-buy-bitcoin-ethereum

When cryptocurrency prices spike, you may question if you should wait to buy Bitcoin or Ethereum at a lower price later. Buying low is only wise after all.

Of course I don’t disagree with the reasoning behind the “buy low, sell high” thinking.

However, the methodology can be difficult if not impossible to accomplish with some investments in real life. And following that philosophy will cost you big opportunities to make money investing in Bitcoin, Ethereum, or other assets.

Let me explain the problem behind this philosophy—because once you understand you’ll become a better investor with more money to show for your efforts than you do now.

The Problem With Waiting To Buy Bitcoin And Ethereum

For people who believe in the cryptocurrency technology and are convinced they’re going to make money investing in the long term, what’s the logic in waiting to buy Bitcoin, Ethereum, or any other asset?

It’s simple: the thought process is by waiting to buy at a later time they can get Bitcoin at a cheaper price and make more money years from the date you purchased.

In a vacuum that strategy is unbeatable. However the market doesn’t work that way! In reality this strategy is very often botched.

Because every day you wait to buy Bitcoin, you run the risk of not buying lower—which you intend—but buying higher—the complete opposite of your plan.

Many times the price is never lower in the future than what it is currently. So buying high, could still mean buying lower than any price point you’re ever going to get going forward. Got it?

It doesn’t make sense to miss out on gains because you’re waiting for the perfect storm when the price of Bitcoin drops 50% in a day—that’s extremely unlikely and by no means guaranteed to happen.

With potentially revolutionary assets like this, my opinion is it’s better to get in the game as soon as possible, even if the price is at an all-time high and you feel like johnny-come-lately.

Think about this: The price of Bitcoin was once at an all-time high of $10, so if you never invested then because you were waiting until it went down to $8 then you cost yourself millions of dollars as one Bitcoin is trading for over $8,000 today.

I didn’t forget about the visual learners out there. Take a look at this price chart to look at every investor that got hammered assuming they waited for Bitcoin to go down when instead it shot up to the moon almost every month since 2013.

bitcoin-price-chart

There are only a few months, from 2013 on, in that chart where you’d have been better off to not buy Bitcoin and instead buy it the next month. The super majority of months show that it’s crazy talk to wait to buy this hot cryptocurrency.

And this logic is exactly why it makes the most sense to invest with a strategy called dollar-cost averaging.

Use Dollar-Cost Averaging To Build Your Position

Dollar-cost averaging is an investment strategy that recommends you buy a fixed dollar amount of an asset at the same time every month.

For example, someone using dollar-cost averaging to invest in this coin would set aside $300 to purchase Bitcoin on the 15th of every month for (at least) 12 months—no matter the current cost of one Bitcoin.

By doing this, the individual purchases more Bitcoin (or shares) when the prices are low and fewer Bitcoin (or shares) when the price is high. But their dollar amount invested stays the same following this philosophy—and they’re guaranteed to own some of the asset instead of wait on the sidelines.

The difference is simply you’re just gradually investing over months and years instead of investing a huge sum of money one day. And based on the past, performance increases when you invest with dollar-cast averaging.

The reason this technique works well is it’s impossible to time the market.

No one knows when Bitcoin, Ethereum, or stock prices are going to go up or down at any given moment. There’s too many moving parts and random things that can affect the price to accurately predict price movements.

And dollar-cost averaging ensures you don’t buy high and takes your emotions out of investing since all you have to do is stick to a set plan. Even better, set up an automatic investment the day after you get your paycheck to relieve you of the manual labor.

This is a winning investing strategy you should absolutely adapt to maximize your profits.

Final Words

While most people are either waiting too long to invest in these cryptocurrencies or buying them at their peaks, you’ll be using dollar cost-averaging to rake in more profits.

Keep at this and you’ll go from a percentage of a coin to owning a full coin, and then maybe owning 3, 5, or 10 coins plus over time.

If cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin and Ethereum are not your thing, I’d encourage you to execute on this dollar-cost averaging strategy to buy index funds in the stock market. The strategy works just as well here.

And it’s not only a smart strategy in this space, but when wanting to increase your position in any asset—painting, real estate, coin collections, car collections, etc.

Best of luck in your investments and journey to financial freedom!

The above references an opinion and is for information purposes only. It is not intended to be investment advice. Seek a duly licensed professional for investment advice.

Related: Why 1 Bitcoin Can Be Worth $100,000 In A Few Years

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Interview: Multi-Millionaire & CreditLoan.com Founder, Dan Wesley

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dan-lesley

It’s not every day I get to interview an early Internet power player like this guy.

Dan Wesley founded CreditLoan.com in 2003 and then exited this startup 8 years later with an 8 figure payout. He’s also been a contributor for top publications like Forbes, Mashable, Huffington Post, and Inc.—among other impressive accomplishments.

Confident that Mr. Wesley is rich in knowledge and you guys would take away some solid insights from him, I asked him for an interview and he happily said yes.

The main topics covered below are financial ones like student loans, credit cards, personal loans—you know, that important stuff that ultimately decides how much money you end up with, which controls how free you are to do what you love. And then the interview finishes off with Dan sharing some of his best life lessons.

Getting your money right is a big deal and Dan is going to help us.

Let’s just dive into this goodness so you don’t have to wait any longer.

1. What led you to start CreditLoan.com and help millions of people financially in the process?

Humble beginnings – I grew up well below the poverty line with the deck stacked against me, like millions from all walks of life, face today. So, I decided to do something about it long before the Nerdwallet’s of the world.

As you can imagine in 1998, Google is, what, 3 years old? Yahoo, Lycos, Netscape are the main events. It took me awhile to get going (2003 is when I really started to publish consistently). It’s been a fairy tale of sorts, as I ended up completely bootstrapping this from a $5,000 tax return to an 8 figure exit.

I still run the business today, the only regret is I only started to scale things (with venture capital) just a year ago.

I could have been Nerdwallet… but I’ll take it!

2. Where do many college students go wrong with student loans and what should they do instead?

That’s a really great question. I’m 40 and while I don’t have college bound children yet, I took student loans to survive. I was the first to graduate in my family with a college degree. So my parents had just as much understanding as I did of student loans plus long term implications. This is a fancy way of saying basically no party had ANY idea what I was getting myself into lol!

But if I had a child college bound today, they would definitely be a beneficiary from my student loan experience. So is it survival? Generational knowledge gap equaling naivety across the board (parent <=>)? The lack of obvious life experience for most college students? You only learn from making mistakes right? Is that inevitable? I don’t know.

Personally, I know I should’ve just stuck to subsidized loans but I ended up taking on unsubsidized as well (I don’t believe these exist anymore and rightfully so). The student loan alternatives: are grants (is Matthew Lesko still around? ha!), employer tuition assistance, military GI bill, and scholarships.

3. Since 1998, when you started helping consumers on financial issues, until now in 2017, what’s changed most about personal finance in your opinion?

Great question! First off, the amount of personal finance information on the web, hands down. They call it “content shock”. Digital information overload plus ubiquity of mobile with always being “connected” (love this graphic…worth a 1,000 words I tell ya).

I read a few years back (2012 I believe), over 2 million pieces of content are published everyday. I can’t imagine how that has grown exponential today. Moreover, I think there’s a form of censorship in play (unintentional in my opinion, explained below).

As the top finance Google results are dominated by brands (nerdwallet, bankrate, thesimpledollar, thebalance) it’s tough for small businesses with better end user value propositions to overcome these behemoths. But I don’t think Google is doing this on purpose—naturally you have so many bad players that Google (as the police officer) ends rewarding the brands that are trusted the most.

If they are trusted the most, you can assume they’re content is commensurate (plays right into Google’s “yo money, yo life” search ranking guidelines).

At the end of the day, the consumer votes with engagement metrics and all Google does is aggregate that against the population of finance sites—it’s that simple in my opinion.

We always pander to the user, not the search engine.

4. Do you recommend 20+ year olds get a credit card? Why or why not?

Can we really stop them? Paraphrasing a great quote, “The only substitute for life experience is being 20”, right?

I’m 50/50 on this. It’s situational – some 20 year olds act like their 40 and others act like they are 10. The key here in my opinion, is limit yourself to just 1 major credit card. You want that credit card as an outlet, safety valve (discretionary or not, things happen and we are human after at all).

In my opinion, no credit card equals no life experience, more risk, potentially more costly to a 20 year olds’ cashflow. (Example: overdraft fee or a late electric bill payment sometimes exceed the interest only payment of that respective credit card.)

In my opinion, a credit card equals life experience if used responsibly; you want that credit card as an outlet, safety valve (discretionary or not…things happen and we are human after at all). Bad credit, as we know, has a nasty butterfly effect when you are trying to finance a car, get an apartment, it unnecessarily complicates your life (I’ve been there begging my parents to co-sign).

Related: Credit Cards Are Your Best Friend

5. How many credit cards do you personally have? What ones? And what’s the purpose behind each one?

I have an Amex Black, Discover, Visa Black. Primary use is, honestly, an additional layer of security (would rather have my credit card compromised vs my bank card).

The Amex Black is awesome for making a point though. I don’t play the I’m-a-multimillionaire-card (you can ask anyone). I’m a pretty laid back, humble guy, but I can totally upend any perceived judgement, underestimation fairly quickly ;).

6. I’m sure there’s a wealth of information you could go on and on about when it comes to this. But what’s your best single piece of advice for a young adult who needs a personal loan?

My single best advice involves one sheet of paper and two columns: pros on the left, cons on the right. Then you can truly figure out if it’s a need or a want.

Use cause and effect exercise so you can identify the drivers of obtaining a personal loan.

Secondary to that, if you embark on the personal loan quest, be sure to shop around. Get at least 3 quotes: 2 digital (like our site or lending club) and 1 brick n mortar (your local bank).

7. Say I’m 27 years old needing a mortgage for my first home. What’s a key point I need to know to come out with the best interest rate possible?

Due diligence, as you know, many governors in play here. Your credit score and income are two items that single-handedly dictate everything.

Assuming those items are in line, I would advocate for comparative shopping (get 3 quotes).

With so many businesses out there, like Nationwide at times, competing for your business, fully maximize that leverage and use points to buy down the rate.

8. Is there one final knowledge bomb you want to drop on us?

Take things one day at time,  can’t stress this enough. If one day at a time is too overwhelming, slow it down even further. One hour at a time, whatever it takes to catch your breath.

It’s so important. I always remind my 8-year-old son (he plays baseball) when his team is losing:

“How many runs can you score at once?”

He replies: “1 dad…”

I reply: “Then work on 1, son, then 2, then 3”, one at a time.

This puts the most important things into perspective, so you bite off what you can chew and this usually leads to a much better outcome in my experience.

Also, here are a few “Danisms”: “refuse to be a statistic”, “never be denied”, and “move like you got a purpose in life”.

9. Where can we go to learn more about what you do and you?

Here’s my LinkedIn profileI will be launching my personal website by EOY.

Like I mentioned before, I do write for Entrepreneur and my work has been featured in over 150 articles across 61 publications including Time Magazine, WSJ and Business Insider.

CreditLoan.com has also been featured in over 48 books and in 2011, I helped Guy Kawasaki launch his new book (view here).

Final Words

There’s a ton of important information shared in this interview.

But, if you’re a regular reader of Take Your Success, you should know by now that life isn’t about absorbing knowledge and calling it a day. You need to take what Dan Wesley said and put it to action if you desire to see positive results.

I want you to win. Do you want yourself to?

Related: The Best Time To Start Is Now

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Why Your Salary Is Costing You Millions In Earned Income

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salary-makes-you-lazy

The average person craves a salaried job the for comfort, security, and the guarantee they can pay their bills.

But a salary will cost countless people millions of dollars in earned income throughout their career.

It’s ironic that we want a guaranteed income so we can live comfortably leading up to and through retirement.

That’s what society promises, at least, until things become uncomfortable.

Once something bad happens—you get fired, laid off, don’t save enough, salary increase doesn’t keep pace with inflation, make bad financial choices, have expensive kids, get divorced—and now you’re far away from a comfortable retirement nest egg plus have less skills and determination to go make your own money.

The salaried gig looks great on the outside, until you dive deeper to see that it’s often the single biggest demotivator and limiting factor to earning more money.

Your Salary Kills Urgency And Entices Laziness

Though not entirely similar, a salary shares some common characteristics of communism.

You get the same paycheck every month regardless of your performance—pretty close to communism.

At many jobs, a guy like Bill will voluntarily show up at 6 AM every work morning and leave at 8 PM, while slacker Johnny over there shows up at 8 AM and leaves at 6 PM and is paid the exact same wage as Bill.

The paycheck doesn’t reflect the reality that Bill worked 20 plus more hours than Johnny and got a heck of a lot more done than Johnny.

Talk about unfair? The salary gig is cruel, I’m telling you.

And since that situation isn’t fair, human nature will get Bill to think, “Stop working so hard. Why bother to put in the extra hours if I’m not rewarded? I’m going to start acting like Johnny because he’s doing just what’s asked of him and the boss doesn’t notice my performance.”

Now I’m not naive to think that bonuses, raises, and promotions aren’t a thing in the workforce—a differentiator from communism.

However, those are just too much out of your control to count on and you’re not rewarded until months or years later. And they often require smart salary negotiation, which is difficult if you’re not practiced, on top of luck.

Plus, in the example above, if Bill decides to work less and deliver less value then he won’t get the bonus or raise even if there’s one available.

The idea is that a salary often persuades workers to do the bare minimum to keep their job and keep getting paid.

It doesn’t entice individuals to give their all each and every day to not only make themselves double the income, but the company double the return on investment in them as well.

Knowing a paycheck is coming has a cocaine effect where you’re addicted to that monthly guaranteed income even though it’s not in your best interest to rely on it.

What’s worse is the damage it does to your overall net worth.

Guaranteed Income Costs You Millions Of Dollars

The addiction of needing a salary will costs millions of people, millions of dollars in lost income.

Let’s take a look at the multiple reasons why a salary sets you up to fail in the chase towards wealth.

For one, the average salary increase in the US doesn’t match the potential of a hustler who gets to decide their own income based on their work ethic.

A May 2017 forecast from WorldatWork predicts that salary increase budgets for U.S. employers will grow 3 percent on average in 2018 across most employee categories.

Say you make $50,000 a year at your 9 to 5 job you despise. Are you going to bust your butt for 261 work days in the year for a 3% salary increase? I’m not. We’re only talking about $1,500 at that rate.

The work compared to the payoff doesn’t add up to a good deal. It’s not motivating to me. It shouldn’t motivate you.

I could work at McDonald’s and come out with more dollars per hour than that thievery.

You’ll drag your feet for a 3% salary increase (+$1,500), but perform like a workhorse if you have a definite opportunity to double your current income (+$50,000).

That’s a difference in $48,600 between the two of them for the year and this is just the beginning. The difference is exponential over the lifetime of a career.

Second, when your income is entirely in your hands—be it as a beginner entrepreneur, commission sales rep, recruiter, or other job—your butt is on the hot seat from the get go to perform.

There’s no room to take it easy if you want to eat that week and keep your business alive.

Plus, you’ll be motivated to save extra money since this can turn into the business’ emergency fund or a payroll account to hire some contractors or full-time employees.

Meaning each dollar you earn has a higher purpose than eating expensive meals and treating yourself to materialistic clothing purchases.

And by investing in your business, your company and you personally will take home more profits than if your income was tied down by a normal 9 to 5 job.

I’m not surprised when I look at the richest people in each state only to find that none of them are salaried works but entrepreneurs and business owners.

Now you don’t have to be an entrepreneur, but you do need a job with no ceiling on your income if you want to get maximum performance out of yourself and the rewards that come with it.

Third, the rate of your learning is immensely sped up when you have to rely on your own work ethic to make money and pay the bills. You can’t afford to be out of the know in your industry if you want to compete with your competitors.

This is the pressure that forces you to gain knowledge and then use that experience to win more deals for yourself.

Plus, you can compound your knowledge to make more money in the future or consult others on the keys to success based on your experience. These opportunities aren’t there in the corporate world.

By getting off the addicting salary drug and choosing your own medicine, you force yourself to provide value to others so you can ultimately get paid what you’re worth.

And the more patient and skilled you become, the greater this income increases over years then decades.

That’s how your income grows by hundreds of thousands of dollars every year, which adds up to millions, instead of 3% and $1,500 (if that) every year.

Work Like You’re Not On Salary

You only get to do this thing called life once.

Why take the safe and boring road with a salaried job that is like driving a minivan straight on a flat road until retirement, when you can take the thrilling road in a sports car up a mountain with jagged cliffs and unbelievable views?

Bet on yourself. Work your face off. And work like you’re not on salary.

By mixing things up, you’ll discover if your company rewards you for going above and beyond what’s asked of you.

And if they do incentivize your efforts then you don’t need to find a different job. Maybe it doesn’t though and you see the writing on the wall: you’re worth millions more than you will ever earn here so you find a better job you love.

It’s like any pursuit in life, you need to get out of your comfort zone to truly push yourself, grow, and become the best version of yourself.

Happiness comes from personal growth. So take the jump and make the most of it.

Millions of dollars are nice, but the feeling of personal satisfaction from working incredibly hard and getting rewarded for it will far trump the money—every time.

Related: Would You Live Off A Dollar A Day To Achieve Your Dreams?

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Brian Robben's three books.

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